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  • Oct 30 2014

    The Power of Creating Your Own Work: An Interview with Ithamar Enriquez

    Written by Christa Nannos

    The Second City Alum, Ithamar Enriquez, has created his own, one-man show called, Ithamar Has Nothing to Say, and though he doesn’t say a single word throughout the show, he captivates the audience with body language, music, and impeccable characterizations. Having moved to LA a few years ago, he quickly realized the benefits of creating his own work. I had the privilege of interviewing Ithamar to get the inside scoop on the show, and to hear how much he does, in fact, have to say about his creative process and advice for upcoming comedians.

    CN: What was your inspiration behind the show?

    IE: This type of work is something I’ve always been drawn to. Since I was a kid I really loved all the physical comedians. Charlie Chaplin, Laurel and Hardy, Steve Martin, Jerry Lewis, and, of course, Mr. Bean who is a huge influence. I remember seeing Rowan Atkinson’s One Man Show on video, and that changed everything. There are a couple of scenes in that show where he doesn’t speak, and I thought to myself, ‘Oh my gosh, you can actually do this’. Once I started getting more into sketch and improv, I tried to figure out ways I can create sketches that aren’t typical. Physical sketches, musical sketches. So this show has been in the back of my brain for a very long time.

    CN: Why is it so important to create your own work?

    IE: Once I got to LA, I realized it’s very easy to sit back and ask why certain things aren’t happening for you as an actor. ‘Why aren’t I getting an audition? Why aren’t I booking the role’? So the cure for that was to write my own show. As an actor you literally have to create your own job out here. So I decided to write this show. I knew it would be a challenge and really fun, and it’s been all those things. The very first version of the show was 25 minutes long. And since then it’s grown into a 50-minute version and now we’re also working on a web series. In the past year I have worked on it creatively and now see more doors opening for me as well as opportunities for it to be exposed to a bigger audience.

    CN: Your characters never speak in the show but are extremely physical. How did you train for this show?

    IE: By watching those who did it before me. I always tell students, when you’re in this work you have to throw yourself in completely. Watch every movie, read every book, do anything and everything that has to deal with comedy. It really makes me sad when I mention Buster Keaton, the Marx Brothers or Laurel and Hardy, and students will have no idea who I’m talking about. If you don’t know those people you should not be doing comedy. You can take every class in the world that you want, but if you’re not throwing yourself into this world and making it your life, then you’re not going to benefit from it. I think that’s what I’ve always done.

    CN: What came first, the music or the characters?

    IE: It depends. Sometimes I would think of a funny, physical bit and then try to find the perfect piece of music that would try to fit that. There’s one scene I do with a puppet, and at first that scene had a completely different song. By the time it got to the show I changed the song, knowing the bit wouldn’t change that much. For another scene I knew I wanted to do something to the song “White Rabbit” because it’s such a weird and funny song with such a great build, so the bit came after the song.

    CN: How did you come up with your bits? Did any of them come from real life experiences?

    IE: I think just like any show, some of it comes from personal observation, and some of it comes from just sitting and brainstorming ideas. I think Jazz Face came from noticing how people react to Jazz music. And then the Luchador scene is basically what I was doing as a kid. I’ve always loved wrestling and Luchador masks, so that scene was inspired from that.

    CN: You tackle so many variations of body language and physical movements in this piece; you really stretch the audience’s imagination and change all expectations of what might happen next. Was it difficult coming up with so much diverse physicality?

    IE: When you give yourself the task of coming up with a 50 minute show where you can’t speak, you have no choice but to vary it up. Just like a standard sketch show will have blackouts, some political stuff and relationship scenes, I had to translate that into a show where I didn’t speak. Some of the scenes have to be high energy, some of them, a little bit smaller. For some of it you use other parts of your body, ‘Oh, cool! I’ll use my hands and only my hands’. Some scenes you play multiple characters and some you just play one character. And variation in music. Making sure I’m hitting a bunch of different time periods. For the most part my taste tends to be really, really old. So I thought ‘Ah, I should throw some Daft Punk in there’.

    CN: I love how you use some improv, and audience participation in the show. Why did you decide to layer in that art form, and did you find it difficult?

    IE: It was another challenge for me. Can I do pieces that are improvised while not speaking? So I came up with this scene that is mad-libs like, where the audience gives me suggestions and then I act it out. Here’s the thing: I love this type of work so much that I can sit and think about it forever and still come up with ways to do the things that standard comedy shows have, but without speaking.

    CN: Can you tell me a little about the web series idea?

    IE: It follows a curious, whimsical character as he experiences life without speaking. Frank Caeti (director of the live show) and I are writing and producing it along with Maker Studios, Principato Young Entertainment, and Key and Peele. Some of it is taken directly from the live show, and some of it has been written exclusively for the web series. This character experiences everything from a hipster coffee shop to a jazz club to his thoughts that wander when he’s at a laundromat.

    CN: Ithamar Has Nothing to Say is a one-man show, but how important was it to have a creative team to collaborate with, such as working with your director, Frank Caeti?

    IE: Once I knew I wanted to do this show, there was no question in my mind who I wanted to direct it. Frank and I have known each other for so long, and we’ve been working together for so long that it’s such a great, fun, working relationship. He is so smart when it comes to comedy. He’s such a good director because he’s such an amazing performer and writer. I couldn’t and wouldn’t do this without him.

    CN: Can you give some advice to upcoming comedians who might want to create a one-man show but don’t know where to start, and who want to get seen more but are afraid of failing? What are some things you learned during your process of creating, Ithamar Has Nothing to Say?

    IE: First thing I’d say is you have to see a lot of comedy and do a lot of comedy. There’s something to be said about creating your own work. Taking all of the stuff that you’ve learned, and really going out there and writing something for yourself. I remember watching this documentary about comedy, and the one thing that remained constant was everyone saying, ‘The whole time we were writing, we were just writing to make ourselves laugh’. Trust your own comedic instinct and just try it. Don’t be afraid of it failing because the good thing about it not working is that you figure out a way to make it work. Give yourself the opportunity to try it somewhere in front of people. You have to be willing to throw yourself out there without a net. Otherwise you won’t succeed and you won’t create. Also know that you’re never done with something you create. There’s always stuff to work around with and a year from now who knows where this show will be? Maybe I’ll be in another show where I’m talking non-stop. You just never know what’s ahead. So do the thing that you’re excited about now and trust that it’s going to grow into something else and might lead you in other directions.

    ITHAMAR HAS NOTHING TO SAY can be seen every Saturday at 8pm through Dec 20th at Second City Hollywood.

    TICKETS

    The Second City Studio Theatre is located at 6560 Hollywood Blvd. LA, CA 90028

    10/30/2014 Comments (0)
  • May 30 2013

    Second City Offers Exclusive New Video Course in Partnership with Funny or Die

    Two of America's top comedy creators, The Second City and Funny Or Die, have collaborated on an exclusive new video course. The pilot program will launch at The Second City Training Center's Hollywood campus (6560 Hollywood Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90028) beginning July 2, 2013. Similar programs will be launched at The Second City Training Centers in Chicago and Toronto in the Fall of 2013.

    The first course offering focuses on DIY or guerilla-style filmmaking with an emphasis on creating short form comedic video content. The course curriculum includes pitching video ideas, scripting and on-location coaching. Basic cameras, lighting equipment and editing software will be provided by The Second City. Students are encouraged to use their own equipment as well.

    Course curriculum has been co-created by Funny Or Die Creative Director, Andrew Steele, and Second City Training Center Artistic Director, Joshua Funk. Course will be taught by Mr. Steele, Mr. Funk and other key Second City and Funny Or Die talent.

    "While The Second City has perfected the process for creating theatrical material," states Andrew Alexander, CEO/Managing Partner of The Second City, "our friends at Funny Or Die have been perfecting the formula for creating funny, edgy and satirical short form videos. In the current comedy environment, it pays to be prolific. Having the right tools and coaching for short form digital content is an important asset for any writer and performer."

    "It makes perfect sense to us. No one teaches short form sketch comedy better than Second City and we think we're pretty good at translating that form to the web," states Andrew Steele, Creative Director for Funny Or Die. "We were kind of stunned that they would come to us but I guess they know what they're doing. I hope they know what they're doing." He added, "This is a natural fit for us. We both have short form comedy in our DNA. And it gives us the added bonus of maybe stealing some of their better talent."

    Course Description
    Creating Video for Funny Or Die is a 12 week course in creating comedic digital shorts. Each student receives weekly feedback from Funny Or Die creative staff and has weekly check-ins with a Second City writing instructor and director. After completion of the 12 week course, each student will have his or her own fully produced digital short. Funny Or Die will post all student content on their main site under a section specifically designated for Second City Training Center student works.

    10 classes meet over 12 weeks
    $995
    Prerequisite: None

    Class meets at the Second City Training Center Hollywood, 6560 Hollywood Blvd.
    Tuesdays beginning July 2. Class runs through September 17. 6:30-10:00pm

    Register for the class here.

    5/30/2013 Comments (0)
  • Jul 11 2012

    Win a free class from IFC's BUNK

    The Second City Training Center is one of a number of improv schools around the country to offer a free class to social media followers of the IFC comedy show BUNK. Each Friday night after BUNK airs, they will post a challenge on their Twitter feed, and the lucky winners receive a voucher to use for a class. Check out their website for the details.

    Also, don't forget to follow the Chicago Training Center on Twitter @SecondCityChiTC and Second City Hollywood @SecondCityLA

    7/11/2012 Comments (3)
  • May 24 2012

    Frank Caeti and Matt Craig to return to Piccolo Fringe

    Frank Caeti and Matt Craig to return to Piccolo Fringe this weekend. After three popular turns at Piccolo Fringe, Los Angeles improv duo FrankenMatt (commonly referred to as "the short guy and the tall guy") return to Charleston with American Imperil, an evolving, politically themed sketch show that takes their familiar brand in new directions. Read more about their Piccolo performances here. American Imperil was originally presented the Hollywood Studio Stage and we wish the guys tons of success with it at the festival!

    5/24/2012 Comments (0)
  • Apr 11 2012

    Douglas Eby Covers Second City Hollywood

    In a recent post on The Creative Mind, Douglas Eby writes about improv, both in music and drama. During the part about improv on the stage he cites a recent book by Jonah Lehrer who wrote about his experience studying Double Down at Second City Hollywood. onah said he wanted to try improv while he was here, but was intimidated because the performers were so good.

    Read the full article here.

    4/11/2012 Comments (1)
  • Feb 22 2012

    RedEye Interviews Second City Alum, Maribeth Monroe, About Her Experience On "Workaholics"

    If you haven't seen "Workaholics" yet, you are missing Maribeth Monroe playing the ice-cold boss of three friends who work together as telemarketers from 9 to 5 and live together from 5 to 9. In reality, the three friends are Anders Holm, Blake Anderson, and Adam Devine, alumni of The Second City Training Center. Maribeth talks with the RedEye about her part in "Workaholics" and how Anders saw her on The Second City's Mainstage when he was a student in Chicago's Conservatory. Read the whole interview.

    For more information on classes and summer camps, see our class catalog.

    2/22/2012 Comments (0)
  • Jan 6 2012

    "American Imperil" Makes Angeleno Magazine's Top 10 Events for January

    The Friday night showcase at Second City Hollywood, "American Imperil," was picked as one of the top 10 events in January by Angeleno Magazine. See the full list of events here.

    1/6/2012 Comments (1)
  • Jan 4 2012

    Second City Alum, Keegan-Michael Key, Stars with Jordan Peele in Comedy Central's "Key and Peele" Sketch Series

    Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele make their debut on Tuesday, January 31 at 10:30 p.m. ET/PT. Key was a member of Second City Detroit's mainstage cast as well as the Second City Chicago's e.t.c. theatre, where he wrote and performed shows "Holy War, Batman!" and "Curious George Goes to War" for which he won several Joseph Jefferson Awards (which honor excellence in Chicago theater). Read the whole release here.

    Check out Keegan-Michael Key's sketch informing potential students of how cool Second City Training Center classes are here (Not Safe for Work):

    1/4/2012 Comments (0)
  • Dec 14 2011

    Joshua Funk Interviewed by ithentic.com

    Joshua Funk, Vice President of Television Development and New Media & Artistic Director, The Second City Training Center Hollywood, talks New Media Production. Click here to read the article.

    12/14/2011 Comments (0)
  • Nov 7 2011

    Celebrities Performing at Second City Hollywood this November and December

    The Second City Studio Stage in Hollywood welcomes many favorite celebrities in the coming weeks! Jim Belushi continues his run of performances wih Rob Belushi and John Barinholtz in "Sheldon" at 8pm Nov 14. Paul F. Tompkins will guest in "Late Night with Howie Kremer" Dec 9. Fred Willard's "MoHos" continue their monthly run at Second City Hollywood with an appearance in the "Twice as Nice" charity show Dec 10. Bob Odenkirk will also be appearing Dec 10 in the show "Second City This Week." And Molly Ringwald is the special guest host for "Second City This Week's" last show of the year on Dec 17!

    Tickets for all shows are aavailable here.

    11/7/2011 Comments (1)